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2/826 David St, Albury, NSW. 2640

TRIBE TERM 4 2021

Oblique rotation & lift

Why?

To target the abdominal obliques, rhomboids and serratus anterior.

How:

Start with the band (or cable) at about waist level.

Step sideways and create tension in the band.

Arms can be slightly bent at the elbows. Extending your arms further away from your body will make the exercise more challenging.

Maintain tension as you raise your hands to the top of your head (without deviating from a straight line) and then return to your waistline.

Face the opposite direction and repeat.

Oblique rotation & lift

Why?

To target the abdominal obliques, rhomboids and serratus anterior.

How:

Start with the band (or cable) at about waist level.

Step sideways and create tension in the band.

Arms can be slightly bent at the elbows. Extending your arms further away from your body will make the exercise more challenging.

Maintain tension as you raise your hands to the top of your head (without deviating from a straight line) and then return to your waistline.

Face the opposite direction and repeat.

Oblique rotation & lift

Why?

To target the abdominal obliques, rhomboids and serratus anterior.

How:

Start with the band (or cable) at about waist level.

Step sideways and create tension in the band.

Arms can be slightly bent at the elbows. Extending your arms further away from your body will make the exercise more challenging.

Maintain tension as you raise your hands to the top of your head (without deviating from a straight line) and then return to your waistline.

Face the opposite direction and repeat.

Oblique rotation & lift

Why?

To target the abdominal obliques, rhomboids and serratus anterior.

How:

Start with the band (or cable) at about waist level.

Step sideways and create tension in the band.

Arms can be slightly bent at the elbows. Extending your arms further away from your body will make the exercise more challenging.

Maintain tension as you raise your hands to the top of your head (without deviating from a straight line) and then return to your waistline.

Face the opposite direction and repeat.

Oblique rotation & lift

Why?

To target the abdominal obliques, rhomboids and serratus anterior.

How:

Start with the band (or cable) at about waist level.

Step sideways and create tension in the band.

Arms can be slightly bent at the elbows. Extending your arms further away from your body will make the exercise more challenging.

Maintain tension as you raise your hands to the top of your head (without deviating from a straight line) and then return to your waistline.

Face the opposite direction and repeat.

Oblique rotation & lift

Why?

To target the abdominal obliques, rhomboids and serratus anterior.

How:

Start with the band (or cable) at about waist level.

Step sideways and create tension in the band.

Arms can be slightly bent at the elbows. Extending your arms further away from your body will make the exercise more challenging.

Maintain tension as you raise your hands to the top of your head (without deviating from a straight line) and then return to your waistline.

Face the opposite direction and repeat.

Oblique rotation & lift

Why?

To target the abdominal obliques, rhomboids and serratus anterior.

How:

Start with the band (or cable) at about waist level.

Step sideways and create tension in the band.

Arms can be slightly bent at the elbows. Extending your arms further away from your body will make the exercise more challenging.

Maintain tension as you raise your hands to the top of your head (without deviating from a straight line) and then return to your waistline.

Face the opposite direction and repeat.

Oblique rotation & lift

Why?

To target the abdominal obliques, rhomboids and serratus anterior.

How:

Start with the band (or cable) at about waist level.

Step sideways and create tension in the band.

Arms can be slightly bent at the elbows. Extending your arms further away from your body will make the exercise more challenging.

Maintain tension as you raise your hands to the top of your head (without deviating from a straight line) and then return to your waistline.

Face the opposite direction and repeat.

Session 1

Chin up. Bar. SPT

How: – Stand under the chin up bar at a height where you are able to grip the bar without jumping. -Take hold of the bar with both hands facing you and shoulder width apart. Bring your shoulder blades back towards each other and down towards your bum. – Pull yourself up to the top position. Your chin should be above your hands and chest pushed out. – From the top position, lower your self down under control to the bottom.

Goblet curtsy lunge

Why?

To strengthen the hip rotators and extensors

How:

Hold the KB by the horns

Keep the weight on the non moving leg

Maintain an erect posture throughout.

Sumo Deadlift SPT

Why? 

You can initiate more leg drive using your hip strength and glutes with greater emphasis. It targets your: adductors, quadriceps, and hamstring muscles, and the entire posterior chain. Many people have weak groin muscles and can help strengthen them this way. Best of all, the sumo deadlift results in less shear force on your lumbar spine, which is why physical therapists use the sumo deadlift to rehab back injuries. 

How: 

Foot placement is about twice shoulder length, lining up the shins with the rings on the barbell. Toes are pointed outwards forty-five degrees, keeping the shin vertical and knees behind the bar. The hips are raised to position the thighs slightly above parallel to the floor. The lumbar spine maintains a neutral position with slight extension and the torso kept as upright as possible. Both hands grip the bar shoulder width apart with the shoulders positioned just in front of the bar. Using alternate grip or hook grip is recommended for heavier loads. Before executing the movement, the muscles of the quadriceps, glutes, and latissimus dorsi should be contracted and the scapula depressed to create tension and stability. To begin the movement, the knees, hips, and back should extend simultaneously. As the bar passes the knees, the glutes contract further, driving the hips forward and keeping the bar in contact with the thighs. Lock out is achieved when the knees, hips, and back are extended fully. Hyperextension of the spine should be avoided